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Thought leadership

Resources, sector challenges and the best ways to overcome them.

eBooks

White papers and research

In this white paper, we do a deep dive into why skills matter to business, the economy and to individuals.

  • The historical context of education and skills in the UK
  • Rationales for increased investment:
    • Economic
    • Society
    • Individual
  • What is needed to be done about the UK skill deficit

For anyone who wants to make the case for more policy attention and funding for skills, why we need better data, and why policy sometimes makes an unfair distinction between skills and academic learning, this is a must read.

The employability sector has faced extreme difficulties as a result of the COVID-19 crisis of 2020. Unemployment has rocketed, redundancies have increased, and recruitment has slowed down. This white paper explores how technology can be utilised to create effective solutions that enable jobseekers to get back to work. The research explores sound evidence that seeks to explain how technology can aid the recovery of the sector.

The employability sector is gearing up to support a large cohort of unemployed people as the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic takes hold. The sector is going to need to both rapidly scale its adviser workforce to cope with the growing demand and find more efficient ways to manage mass re-employment activity at scale.  This research develops a sound evidence base to help service providers (public, private and voluntary sector) target their Adviser recruitment efforts and think creatively about where they can attract new talent for the sector.

It is critical that the university sector position themselves at the heart of the government’s apprenticeship strategy.

Universities need to understand the distinct challenges presented by the apprenticeship regulation and compliance system.

This white paper outlines the pinch points that universities might encounter as it seeks to adopt and expand apprenticeship programmes. In addition, it looks at what solutions are on offer to improve the efficiency, cost-savings and data accumulation necessary to meet government requirements.

Degree and master’s apprenticeships are a fast-growing area of apprenticeship training, rising from 7.4% of new starts in 2016-17 to 17.5% of new starts in 2018-19. But do apprenticeships work for the Russell Group? Despite its primarily academic mission, we argue in this white paper that universities within the Russell Group have some unique advantages when it comes to capitalising on some degree and master’s apprenticeships. And, in turn, how these apprenticeships offer the Russell Group some crucial benefits. In the white paper we cover:
  • How apprenticeships are related to the academic mission of top-level universities
  • In what ways apprenticeships leverage the expertise of Russell Group universities
  • Why apprenticeships help with student employability and widening participation
  • How apprenticeships connect universities to local and national economic strategies
Whilst a positive employment outcome is the principle goal for employability providers, the most important factor is sustained employment.
This research demonstrates that enabling jobseeker self-service with active supervision by an advisor very substantially increases the number of people securing jobs and then staying in these jobs. These results were achieved across the spectrum of jobseekers, including the very long term unemployed and hardest to help.
In the research we cover:
  • Revenue potential if using Aptem Employ
  • Sustained employment outcomes using Aptem Employ
  • The impact of geography on sustained employment